Date Showing Showing On 21, 23, 24 September
Time Showing Monday 6pm, Wednesday 4pm & 6.30pm and Thursday 6pm

Ailo's Journey

G 1hrs 26mins
family | 2018, Finland
Overview

Ailo’s Journey narrates the struggle of a little wild reindeer to survive its first migration. Throughout his journey, the frail and vulnerable wild reindeer will have to overcome the ordeals that mark the first year of his existence. His awakening to the wild world is a true Christmas tale in the heart of the stunning landscapes of Lapland.

Director
Guillaume Maidatchevsky
Original Review
Carlos, Cinema 365
Extracted By
Gill Ireland​
Featuring
Guillaume Aldebert

Watch The Trailer

A Reindeer's Journey - Official Trailer

Storyline (warning: spoilers)

Reindeer are native to Lapland, a region above the Arctic Circle straddling Finland, Norway, Sweden and Russia. The climate is harsh in winter and they have a fair share of predators that cause them difficulties. Climate change has only made the weather worse and worse still, has played havoc with their traditional migration routes – as have loggers who have displaced wolves from their habitat, sending them into places where reindeer once were relatively safe.

This film captures the first year of life for Aȉlo. Donald Sutherland intones that Laplanders have a saying that reindeer get five minutes to learn to stand, five more minutes to learn to walk, then five minutes to learn to run and swim. That’s how dangerous the climate and predator situation is in Lapland. 

Like many nature documentaries, Aȉlo is anthropomorphized to a large extent. Sutherland – who does excellent work here, lending much needed gravitas – imbuing him with human qualities and human thought processes. Chances are, Aȉlo and others of his species don’t spend a lot of time ruminating on how tough life is in the Arctic Circle. Most animals function primarily on instinct and experience. That isn’t to say there aren’t moments that are captivating, such as when Aȉlo mimics a rabbit and later on, a stoat. To add to the plus column, the cinematography is absolutely breath-taking – even the scenes of winter are refined with varying shades of white and blue, all filmed in the low light of perpetual Arctic twilight.

To a large extent, this isn’t as educational as it could be although Sutherland does his best. Labeling lemmings the “chicken nuggets of the North” is kind of amusing, but it oversimplifies their place in the food chain. 

All in all, this is a solid although not remarkable documentary. The film doesn’t turn away from the grim reality of life in a harsh environment (reindeer die, although never on-camera) and the effects that climate change is having on these animals.

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