Date Showing Showing On 26,28, 29 July
Time Showing Monday 6pm, Wednesday 4pm & 6.30pm and Thursday 6pm

Supernova

M 1hrs 35mins
drama | 2021, UK
Overview

Sam and Tusker, partners of 20 years, are traveling across England in their old RV visiting friends, family and places from their past. Since Tusker was diagnosed with early-onset dementia two years ago, their time together is the most important thing they have. As the trip progresses, however, their ideas for the future clash, secrets come out, and their love for each other is tested as never before. Ultimately, they must confront the question of what it means to love one another in the face of Tusker’s illness.

Warnings

Coarse Language

Director
Harry Macqueen
Original Review
Brian Tellerico, Roger Ebert.com
Extracted By
Gill Ireland
Featuring
Colin Firth, Stanley Tucci, Pippa Haywood

Watch The Trailer

SUPERNOVA - Official Trailer - Starring Colin Firth and Stanley Tucci

Storyline (warning: spoilers)

Harry Macqueen wrote and directed the tender story of Sam (Colin Firth) and Tusker (Stanley Tucci), partners for two decades who we meet on a road trip across England (shot with luscious beauty by the great Dick Pope). They bicker a bit about directions and other simple things, but there’s something heavy in the air early in the film. Tusker is fading, and he knows he’s only going to get worse. From the very beginning of the film, Tucci and Firth imbue Sam and Tusker with what so many of these cinematic partnerships lack: history. We believe Sam and Tusker didn’t just meet and aren’t just actors in a scene. They feel like people who know each other’s body language; people who can sense change and emotional unrest in one another in ways that no one else can.
It turns out that the road trip has a few purposes, including reuniting with old friends and family of Sam’s in England. This leads the film to open-up to other characters, but it’s Firth and Tucci’s show from the beginning to the end. It also leads to an unforgettable centrepiece scene in which Tusker is supposed to read a speech at a dinner, but he can’t because of his condition, and so Sam reads the words his lover has written, many of them about him. Sam communicates Tusker's feelings for him. Tucci does some of the best work of his notable career in this scene, conveying the pride in what he’s written about Sam—in many ways, the last time he will be able to express these thoughts about the most important in his life—but also lacing it with the sadness of the moment.
They’re both phenomenal in the movie, finding so many grace notes that elevate a story that could have been maudlin into something that feels truly empathetic. The film ranks among career-best work from both actors.

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